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Archive for the ‘OpenDaylight’ Category

Where Will These Top Carrier SDN Vendors Be One Year From Now?

Last August, Craig Matsumoto of Light Reading posted his listing of the Top 10 Carrier SDN Vendors, admitting “Picking a ‘Top 10’ in software-defined networking (SDN) is a dangerous business, because the whole sector is in flux.” Six months later, how are those ten (actually 11, with OpenDaylight) picks faring?

1. OpenDaylight. Although not an independent vendor, OpenDaylight opens the list because it is a “community-led, open, industry-supported framework, for accelerating adoption, fostering new innovation, reducing risk and creating a more transparent approach to Software-Defined Networking…OpenDaylight is structured using open source development best practices, and is comprised of the leading organizations in the technology industry.”

When OpenDaylight started, it only had two open-source projects. Now, it has sixteen. Thanks to OpenDaylight software-defined networking, rivals and users are being brought together by open source and creating software-defined networking for everyone.

2. VMware/Nicira. A little over a year after the Nicira acquisition, VMware announced its network virtualization platform called NSX whose goal is to enable users to deploy a virtual network for an application at the same speed and operational efficiency as a virtual machine. In addition, VMware announced multiple program enhancements at the VMware Partner Exchange 2014. So it’s safe to say that VMware is still in the game.

3. Juniper/Contrail. Despite one story reporting trouble with the introduction of Contrail to Juniper’s engineering team earlier this year, Juniper continues to position itself to introduce the new approach needed for management, provisioning and maintenance of connections as companies push infrastructure to “hyperscale levels” in anticipation of Big Data, mobile traffic and advanced sync/sharing services. Juniper marketing director Steve Shaw said, “With physical networks simply incapable of handling such a dynamic load, enterprises will find that SDN is necessary, regardless of the long-term ROI.” And Juniper intends to be a part of that.

4. ConteXtream.  In addition to joining the OpenDaylight project, the company collaborated with Cisco Systems to contribute a LISP-based mapping service to the open source SDN project OpenDaylight that enables the federation of SDN controllers across a WAN. Obviously, ConteXtream is still a player.

5. Big Switch Networks. Early on, Big Switch Networks dropped out of its leadership position in the OpenDaylight Project due to, among other things, concerns with Cisco over whose technology would form the foundation of an OpenDaylight SDN controller. Now Big Switch Network reports that it is ready to embark on a new chapter after rebooting its business late last summer.

6. Cyan. Cyan recently announced that its Blue Planet SDN Platform and Z-Series packet-optical hardware have been selected by the Jeollanam-Do province in South Korea. This will be deployed together with partner Telefield with the new network delivering e-government applications in support of the two million citizens living in the province.

7. Alcatel-Lucent/Nuage. In January,  Nuage Networks announced that UPMC selected its software-defined networking platform for deployment in their backup network. Once the staging and verification are deemed successful, UPMC will begin a multi-year transition to Nuage Networks solutions for the rest of its datacenter network infrastructure to support the increased demand from employees, patients, hospitals, and healthcare insurers.

8. Cisco/Insieme. Cisco Systems has been consistently labeled as a late adopter of SDN, but between its “spin-in” with Insieme Networks, unveiling its Application-Centric Infrastructure last November and now the investment of $6 million in Embrane, Cisco is positioning itself for the leadership position once more.

9. Plexxi. Plexxi is still in the news, and has contributed to articles and information for OpenDaylight, but there doesn’t seem to be anything new in the way of product changes or launches.

10. Ciena. Ciena is a Silver-level member of the OpenDaylight Project and active contributor to the OpenDaylight code base. In addition, Ciena reports that it is working closely with their customers to understand the widespread implications of SDN on their existing and future networks. According to a recent interview, one of Ciena’s SDN experts Marc Cohn said, “Parts of our SDN portfolio, such as our V-WAN, are already shipping, and many of our customers have expressed interest in the OpenDaylight framework. As a result Ciena has been closely investigating the potential application of the OpenDaylight framework for future products. Ciena has not yet announced our SDN product plans in this area, but we expect to soon.”

11. Brocade/Vyatta. The Stargate Group, an Australian application service provider (ASP) to the mortgage finance sector, announced on February 12 that it “has taken its first step toward applying software-defined networking (SDN) to its operations with the deployment of Brocade® NetIron® CER 2000 Ethernet/MPLS routers.” And earlier in February, Brocade today introduced the rollout of an enhanced channel program, including a new component specifically designed for software networking partners.

For more information, see Mind Commerce at www.MindCommerce.com

 

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January 2014 bulletin

HappynewyearHappy new year to all our followers!

The main SDN and NFV buzzwords for 2014? We predict: Simplicity, Capability, Speed, Openness and (most importantly) Value For Money!

It’s certainly a bright new year in many ways, in which we are likely to see a whole raft of new virtualization ideas and deployments coming through.

There has been much discussion surrounding SDN and NFV developments in the last few weeks. At the Carrier Network Virtualization conference and exhibition in Palo Alto on 9-11 December, valuable discussion ensued around the future pathway of network virtualization, now that so many possibilities are emerging. A very popular White Box panel asked, can you now tell the difference between a White Box switch by an ODM and one bought from a large traditional vendor? In terms of performance, it is argued that it is very often no longer possible. However, in terms of support around the product, many still prefer the aftercare attention and extra resources provided by established vendors. Yet as the ODMs begin to increase in size and scope, a similar level of aftercare might one day also be available from them. Several new players asserted in discussion that moving away from the established vendors would make way for much more creativity in terms of how technology is used… Only time will tell as to how many operators make that jump.

2014 also marks the final year of the ETSI NFV ISG project in its current form. They have already achieved a great deal, but now the focus will be on drawing their work towards a conclusion which will help to shape the future of the industry. Definitely one to watch…

Meanwhile, the four-day Network Virtualization & SDN World event take places across four days in London on 27-30 May 2014, featuring an API Forum, SDN Summit, many SDN and NFV case studies and over 60 speakers. The brochure is due to be launched in 2-3 weeks’ time.  To find out more and to apply to take part, please visit www.sdnworldevent.com or contact Owen.Lochner@informa.com for information on sponsorship and exhibiting.

Please find below a round-up of other news we’ve spotted this month…

Wishing you all a happy and healthy year ahead,

Georgina Wilczek, Editor, SDNWorldNews.com

In the News:

The Industry’s Top Five Movers and Shakers for 2014

What to Watch in 2014

SDN Still Failing to Spark Interest in Europe

Plans for the first OpenDaylight Summit take shape

A Look At Cisco’s SDN Future

SDN Will Never Happen, SaysVMware Exec 

What Makes an Open Source Project Successful

NFV Said to SDN: “I’ll Be There For You”

Openness is the way forward…

CircleThe terms ‘openness’ and ‘collaboration’ are turning into quite a fashion at the moment among vendors in the broadband space. The trend is to be seen to be displaying all cards out in the open, working for the greater good and moving away from the proprietary natures of their past.

All this is very praiseworthy. And new. But is it just a fashion, or can it last?

Well, as operators look towards applying software and virtualization to key elements of their networks, the one thing they want is openness. If the components of their networks are open, so the theory goes, operators can then choose to mix and match, and if they wish, build in new software equipment by new market place vendors at more competitive prices than if they were to stick solely to solutions from the traditional vendor community.

On the surface, you would think this threat would be a very good reason for the traditional vendors not to support openness! But with so many new virtualization players coming through into the marketplace regardless, and operators’ keenness to embrace what they have to offer, it is an issue that they can no longer avoid.

If a traditional vendor is to succeed, they need to be seen not only to be co-operating, but moving the industry forward into a new collaborative era. During 2013, we have seen them opt instead for a very different tack: embrace and lead from the front! (Cue headlines such as “openness is a critical attribute” – Ciena and “openness from the top down is critical” – Cisco).

Collaborative efforts are becoming ever more in focus, including the OpenDaylight project, ETSI’s Network Functions Virtualization Industry Specification Group, the OpenStack Foundation, the Open Networking Forum and the newly formed CloudNFV group.

All of these groups are centred on sharing wisdom and resources for the greater good, finding common solutions and working together to find better solutions for operator networks at lower prices.

opencardsToo good to be true? Perhaps. But by placing themselves at the forefront of the new revolution, traditional vendors are maximising the chance of being able to retain existing operator loyalty whilst transforming themselves into all-encompassing new businesses which can cater for all.

So is collaboration among vendors a permanent new way of being? And can the traditional vendors survive?

Well for as long as they continue to be show themselves as co-operative and responsive to operator needs, they certainly stand a chance…

The theme of Openness is a key subject at this year’s Broadband World Forum, taking place in Amsterdam on 22-24 October 2013. For further information, visit http://www.broadbandworldforum.com

SDN gets creative…

innovation

After all the talk and hype around SDN and NFV in recent months, it is great to see the growing number of announcements about various SDN and NFV projects beginning to move into the reality phase for a growing number of telcos.

In recent weeks, there has been a great deal of talk online about the potential of virtualizing all parts of the network. So which will be the first bits to be virtualized? And which should be left untouched?

The chances are that you may already have opinions on where SDN and NFV can be of the most benefit long term. But here are a few articles we’ve come across lately which we think make for some interesting reading…

In the News

Developing the SDDC (Software-Defined Data Center)

Virtualizing the Home Gateways to Reduce Energy Power Consumption

Transport SDN: A New Flavour for Software-Defined Networking

SDN at the Network Edge

NFV Group Flocks to Proof-of-Concept Models

Operators Reveal Where They Plan to Deploy SDN and NFV First

10 Things you Shouldn’t Virtualize

Cisco’s Igniting Security Services with SourceFire

OpenDaylight Begins to Mature

Clouding Up the NFV Transition